Thursday, May 03, 2018

PURPOSEFUL EDUCATION: Bates College has designed a liberal arts education fit for the future of work — Quartz

Bates College has designed a liberal arts education fit for the future of work — Quartz: " by JENNY ANDERSON



Students overwhelmingly report they would recommend a purposeful work infused class (94%), and agree that practitioner-taught courses are a good addition to the syllabus (96%). Ninety-seven percent of employers agreed the purposeful work interns “added value,” and 91% said the Bates student involved in an internship would be a competitive candidate for a full-time job.
 “Work is fundamental to who you are and who you will become.” Spencer is pleased with the results so far, but notes that her main goal going forward is equity of opportunity. “I want to make sure our first gen[eration] students of color—groups for whom this kind of college is less part of the fabric in which they grew up—are optimizing their degrees,” she said. Fulfillment should not be dictated by wealth, class, or race. Everyone needs a chance to get into the mess of figuring out a life’s work.
“’Work’ is not something that is ‘out there’ in the ‘real world’ waiting for you, while you’re ‘in here’ for the next four years ‘doing college,'” Spencer said in a speech to Bishop’s University in 2015. “Work is fundamental to who you are and who you will become. And I hope you realize by now that you have been working all of your life.” Or, to quote Annie Dillard, “How we spend our days is how we spend our lives.”
In her inaugural speech, Spencer cited the theologian Peter Gomes, who said that liberal arts colleges put “the making of a better person ahead of the making of a brighter person, or a better mousetrap.” The time in which young people encounter mousetraps will come. It is Bates’ job to make sure students know how to escape it.


Students overwhelmingly report they would recommend a purposeful work infused class (94%), and agree that practitioner-taught courses are a good addition to the syllabus (96%). Ninety-seven percent of employers agreed the purposeful work interns “added value,” and 91% said the Bates student involved in an internship would be a competitive candidate for a full-time job.

 “Work is fundamental to who you are and who you will become.” Spencer is pleased with the results so far, but notes that her main goal going forward is equity of opportunity. “I want to make sure our first gen[eration] students of color—groups for whom this kind of college is less part of the fabric in which they grew up—are optimizing their degrees,” she said. Fulfillment should not be dictated by wealth, class, or race. Everyone needs a chance to get into the mess of figuring out a life’s work.
“’Work’ is not something that is ‘out there’ in the ‘real world’ waiting for you, while you’re ‘in here’ for the next four years ‘doing college,'” Spencer said in a speech to Bishop’s University in 2015. “Work is fundamental to who you are and who you will become. And I hope you realize by now that you have been working all of your life.” Or, to quote Annie Dillard, “How we spend our days is how we spend our lives.”
In her inaugural speech, Spencer cited the theologian Peter Gomes, who said that liberal arts colleges put “the making of a better person ahead of the making of a brighter person, or a better mousetrap.” The time in which young people encounter mousetraps will come. It is Bates’ job to make sure students know how to escape it.

















Students overwhelmingly report they would recommend a purposeful work infused class (94%), and agree that practitioner-taught courses are a good addition to the syllabus (96%). Ninety-seven percent of employers agreed the purposeful work interns “added value,” and 91% said the Bates student involved in an internship would be a competitive candidate for a full-time job.   “Work is fundamental to who you are and who you will become.”   Spencer is pleased with the results so far, but notes that her main goal going forward is equity of opportunity. “I want to make sure our first gen[eration] students of color—groups for whom this kind of college is less part of the fabric in which they grew up—are optimizing their degrees,” she said. Fulfillment should not be dictated by wealth, class, or race. Everyone needs a chance to get into the mess of figuring out a life’s work. “’Work’ is not something that is ‘out there’ in the ‘real world’ waiting for you, while you’re ‘in here’ for the next four years ‘doing college,'” Spencer said in a speech to Bishop’s University in 2015. “Work is fundamental to who you are and who you will become. And I hope you realize by now that you have been working all of your life.” Or, to quote Annie Dillard, “How we spend our days is how we spend our lives.” In her inaugural speech, Spencer cited the theologian Peter Gomes, who said that liberal arts colleges put “the making of a better person ahead of the making of a brighter person, or a better mousetrap.” The time in which young people encounter mousetraps will come. It is Bates’ job to make sure students know how to escape it."



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