Tuesday, November 28, 2017

Equal Pay Movement: ASking For A Pay-Raise, Women Hesitate in The United States: Important





















 Ask For A Raise? Most Women Hesitate


February 14, 2017

In
the face of a persistent gender pay gap, researchers and women's advocates are
focusing on one little-discussed part of the problem: Women simply don't ask
for more money.
There
are many reasons why, despite widespread gains in the workplace, women still
earn on average about 78 cents to a man's dollar. But the failure to negotiate
higher pay is crucial. Research shows men are four times more likely than women
to ask for a salary raise, and economist Linda Babcock
of Carnegie Mellon University says this has a snowball effect. Even a small pay
boost will mean bigger annual raises and possibly bigger bonuses and it will
carry over to a new employer, who is almost certain to ask: What was your
last salary?
"I
tell my graduate students that by not negotiating their job at the beginning of
their career, they're leaving anywhere between $1 million and $1.5 million on
the table in lost earnings over their lifetime," Babcock says.
And
her figure doesn't even include company retirement contributions, which are
also based on a share of salary.
Babcock
says women often just don't think of asking for more pay. If they do, they find
the very notion of haggling intimidating, even scary.
"They
wait to be offered a salary increase," she says. "They wait to be
offered a promotion. They wait to be assigned the task or team or job that they
want. And those things typically don't happen very often."
In
fact, this hesitation might be for good reason. It turns out that when women do
negotiate, it can backfire.
'Way
Too Aggressive'
Babcock
showed people videos of men and women asking for a raise, following the exact
same script. People liked the man's style and said, 'Yes, pay him more.' But
the woman?

I tell my graduate students that by not negotiating
their job at the beginning of their career, they're leaving anywhere between $1
million and $1.5 million on the table in lost earnings over their lifetime.

- Linda Babcock of CMU
"People
found that to be way too aggressive," Babcock says. "She was
successful in getting the money, but people did not like her. They thought she
was too demanding. And this can have real consequences for a woman's
career."
To
be clear, both men and women thought this way.
Babcock
and Harvard researcher Hannah Riley Bowles wanted to find a way for women to
ask for more yet avoid this societal backlash. They tested various strategies
and found some that do work. Women can justify the request by saying their team
leader, for example, thought they should ask for a raise. Or they can convince
the boss their negotiating skills are good for the company. The trick, Babcock
says, is to conform to a feminine stereotype: appear friendly, warm and
concerned for others above yourself.
"I
gotta say, that was very depressing!" she says with a laugh.
Lisa
Gates also found herself depressed. She's a life coach in Santa Barbara,
Calif., and she helps women create all sorts of plans to advance themselves.
But then she finds they just can't — or won't — ask for what they want.
A year ago Gates teamed up with mediation expert Victoria Pynchon to teach a
course called She Negotiates. They teach
coaching sessions via teleconference, honing skills they say are useful well
beyond the office.
Silence
Is Golden
In
one recent role-play, a student named Deborah wants to ask her ex-husband for
an advance in child support.
"Marty,
I'm just, I'm wondering how you feel about all this," she says, and then
rambles on about a conversation the two had the week before, her insecurities
as a parent and a loved one with Alzheimer's.
"Stop!
Stop!" Pynchon cuts in. "Brilliant opening open-ended question,"
she tells Deborah. "And then you're uncomfortable and when you're
uncomfortable you talk."
Deborah
admits as much. Pynchon advises her that "the most powerful negotiation
tool is silence."
Her
business partner, Lisa Gates, says women get better with practice, so she gives
assignments.
"We
might have them go out and negotiate retail," she says. "Try to buy a
pair of shoes and say, 'Did I miss the sale on this? Is there a sale coming up?
I'd like to get the sale price on these shoes.'"

Program
for Research & Outreach on Gender Equity in Society
Girl Scouts can carry out a series of 10
negotiations to earn a badge called Win-Win.
Speaking
Up
Trudie
Olsen-Curtis had been at the same bartending job for four years when she signed
up for the negotiating course.
"I
had honestly not really thought about asking for a raise before," she
says.
Olsen-Curtis
learned to assess her skills based on their market value. She then worked up
the nerve and approached her boss, reminding him she was punctual, honest and
loyal.
"I
felt like I was pretty tough," she says. "Because he kept trying to
maneuver around it, talking about the economy, la la la, you know. I had to
keep bringing him back to, 'This is the value that I give you.'"
It
worked. Olsen-Curtis got a 25 percent raise.
Researcher Linda Babcock has decided
real change must start young. She's launched an effort to teach negotiating skills to girls
and came up with this new twist on an old tradition: Girl Scouts can now carry
out a series of 10 negotiations to earn a badge called
"Win-Win."2/20/11
--

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G20 strikes
compromise on global imbalances
By Ralph Atkins and
Quentin Peel in Paris
Published: February
19 2011 18:45 | Last updated: February 20 2011 16:02
The world’s
leading finance ministers and central bankers overcame Chinese objections at
the weekend to strike a compromise deal meant as a first step towards tackling
global economic imbalances.
France secured
agreement at a Paris summit of the G20 group of countries on indicators that
would be monitored to avert future economic crises. But China successfully
blocked greater scrutiny of its massive foreign exchange reserves and the use
of exchange rates as an indicator.
EDITOR’S CHOICE
Christine
Lagarde, French finance minister, said the negotiations had been “frank, at
times tense” but nevertheless amounted to a step forward towards greater global
co-ordination of economic and fiscal policies.
Separately the
meeting reacted to the unrest in the Middle East by agreeing to
“stand ready to support Egypt and Tunisia”. Under pressure from G20 members
including Saudi Arabia and China, however, the ministers stopped short of
stronger language supporting democracy.
Ms Lagarde said
the economic imbalance indicators would include domestic policies of all the
G20 members, including public sector debt and deficits and private savings
rates, as well as external imbalances “composed of the trade balance and net
investment income flows and transfers”.
The choice of
words, negotiated by senior officials throughout Friday night, was apparently
to avoid any reference to “current account” imbalances – another Chinese
objection. And instead of singling out exchange rates as a specific indicator,
the ministers agreed merely to “take due consideration of exchange rate,
fiscal, monetary and other policies.”
According to
officials closely involved in the negotiations, China was virtually isolated
from the beginning of the meeting. At one stage all reference to exchange rates
was removed from the text to reassure Beijing, but reinserted at the insistence
of countries including the US, Germany and the UK.
Ms Lagarde,
who chaired the meeting, said the indicators would be used “to test economic
policies and determine how good they are for all member states, and not only
for the domestic policy of a given country.”
Welcoming the
agreement, Tim Geithner, US Treasury secretary, said the world still needed to
“establish stronger norms for exchange rate policies”.
“There is
broad consensus that not just Europe, Japan and the US, but also the large
emerging economies need to allow their exchange rates to adjust in response to
market forces.”
Despite the
obvious compromises, Jean-Claude Trichet, European Central Bank president, said
the G20 indicators were “capturing what was needed to be effective … there is
no doubt what we are aiming at”.
Saturday’s
deal paves the way for the next stage in the process, to draw up “indicative
guidelines” for each of the selected economic indicators, but not precise
targets, to warn of the re-emergence of severe imbalances between the G20
members. A deadline of April has been set for agreement on such “benchmarks”,
and the International Monetary Fund has been instructed to provide a G20-wide
assessment of policies by October.
Deadlock
threatened the weekend talks after Xie Xuren, China’s finance minister, on
Friday rejected the idea of monitoring real effective exchange
rates
and foreign exchange reserves.
Wolfgang
Schäuble, German finance minister, who was equally opposed to any precise
targets to limit the trade surpluses of export-led economies, played a key role
in persuading his Chinese counterpart to accept a compromise, according to
officials close to the talks. Canada and India co-chaired the working group
seeking to negotiate a deal.
Meanwhile, the
UK took comfort from a reference in the communiqué to addressing
“expeditiously” the issue of all systemically important banks – those
considered “too big too fail” – once a framework had been agreed for those with
a global reach. The UK government had feared the globally orientated City of
London would be put at a disadvantage.
On the Middle
East, the communiqué pledged responses to Egypt and Tunisia at the “appropriate
time,” designed to benefit “the whole population and the stabilisation of their
economies”.

Copyright The Financial Times Limited 2011.
You may share using our article tools. Please don't cut articles from FT.com
and redistribute by email or post to the web.
--

IQ,
family econ status & self-control SKILLS.
Difficulty;
Ntn academy of sciences.
It can
be taught:
SELF-CONTROL.=TEACH
‘EM TO HANG UP THEIR OWN COAT 9SELF-MANAGEMENT, MANAGE THEMSELVES, MAKE
INDEPENDENT DECISIONS.
LEARN
DELAYING GRATIFICATION. NO SCREEN TIME, UNLESS THE HOMEWORK IS DONE. PICKING UP
BLOCKS WHEN U R VERY YOUNG.


--



19 October 2010 Last updated at 11:23 ET
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Q&A: France Roma expulsions
France is controversially deporting Romanian and
Bulgarian Roma (Gypsies) as part of a crackdown on illegal camps in the
country.
The trigger was a clash in July between French Roma
and police in the town of Saint Aignan. France's deportations have been widely
criticised in the EU.

The government
says it will dismantle 300 illegal camps and squats
What prompted the
latest government action?
Roma in Europe
            Hewitt: Fierce
row
            EU gives France warning on Roma
            Delays bedevil EU help for Roma
            Roma face struggle in Romania
In July, dozens of French Roma armed with hatchets and
iron bars attacked a police station, hacked down trees and burned cars in the
small Loire Valley town of Saint Aignan.
The riot erupted after a gendarme shot and killed a
French Roma, 22-year-old Luigi Duquenet, who officials said had driven through
a police checkpoint, knocking over a policeman. Media reports suggested he had
been involved in a burglary earlier that day.
Duquenet's family dispute the police version of
events, saying he was scared of being stopped because he did not have a valid
driver's licence.
The night before, there were riots in Grenoble after
police shot an alleged armed robber during a shootout.
French President Nicolas Sarkozy called an emergency
ministerial meeting, at which it was decided that some 300 illegal camps and
squats would be dismantled within three months.
A statement from the president's office said the camps
were "sources of illegal trafficking, of profoundly shocking living
standards, of exploitation of children for begging, of prostitution and
crime".
Dozens of camps have since been shut down. Those found
to be living illegally in France are being sent home.
The move is part of a raft of new hardline security
measures recently announced by the government, which has struggled with low
approval ratings in the opinion polls.
Has this happened
before?
In fact, France has closed down illegal Roma camps and
sent their inhabitants home for years. Last year 10,000 Roma were sent back to
Romania and Bulgaria, the government says.
What is the EU
doing about it?
EU Justice Commissioner Viviane Reding described the
deportations as a "disgrace" and the European Commission took a first
step towards legal action against France.
On 29 September the Commission told France that it had
two weeks to start implementing a 2004 EU
directive on freedom of movement
. France was warned that it
would face an official EU "infringement procedure" if it failed to do
so. The directive sets out rules for deportation cases.
On 19 October Ms Reding said she was satisfied that
France had responded "positively" to the Commission's official
request. The Commission decided not to pursue the infringement procedure.
The Commission refrained from opening a case against
France for alleged discrimination, instead demanding more proof to support
France's claim that it was not deliberately targeting Roma.
Wholesale action against an ethnic minority would
violate EU anti-discrimination laws, including the Charter of
Fundamental Rights
.
In a speech to the European Parliament in September Ms
Reding deplored the fact that a leaked official memo had contradicted
assurances given to her by France that the Roma were not being singled out.
"This is a situation I had thought Europe would
not have to witness again after the Second World War," she said.
Many MEPs also condemned France's deportations.
The Commission has set up a task force to examine how
EU funds earmarked for Roma are being spent. It is also checking to see whether
any other member states are violating EU rules in their treatment of Roma.
Has there been
criticism elsewhere?
Yes. The European Roma Rights Centre said Mr Sarkozy's
plan "reinforces discriminatory perceptions about Roma and travellers and
inflames public opinion against them".
Romanian President Traian Basescu said he understood
"the problems created by the Roma camps outside the French cities"
but he insisted on the "right of every European citizen to move freely in
the EU".
The UN's Committee on the Elimination of Racial
Discrimination sharply criticised France's crackdown and said racism and
xenophobia were undergoing a "significant resurgence".
The Vatican and other Church leaders have also voiced
concern.
Who are the Roma,
and how many Roma are there in France?
The Roma are a nomadic people whose ancestors are
thought to have left north-west India at the beginning of the 11th Century and
scattered across Europe.

There are at least
400,000 Roma - or travelling people - living in France, who are part of
long-established communities.
In addition, there
are about 12,000 Roma from Bulgaria and Romania, many of whom live in unauthorised
camps in urban areas across the country, according the French Roma rights
umbrella group FNASAT.
Romania and
Bulgaria joined the EU in 2007, don't their citizens have freedom of movement
within the EU?
They have the right to enter France without a visa,
but under special rules they must have work or residency permits if they wish
to stay longer than three months.
These are hard to come by, and most Roma from the two
countries are thought to be in France illegally.
Nine other EU states also have restrictions in place,
typically requiring work permits.
From January 2014, or seven years after the two
countries' accession, Romanians and Bulgarians will enjoy full freedom of
movement anywhere in the EU.

Is France united
behind the deportations?
French Interior Minister Brice Hortefeux said the new
measures were "not meant to stigmatise any community, regardless of who
they are, but to punish illegal behaviour".
The government said the measures were in line with
European rules. Opinion polls suggest that as many as 65% of French people back
the government's tough line.
Foreign-born Roma are often seen begging on the
streets of France's cities, and many French people consider them a nuisance.
French opposition parties have condemned the
deportations and Mr Sarkozy has faced dissent in his cabinet, too.
Foreign Minister Bernard Kouchner said he was
"shocked" by the government's focus on people of foreign origin,
while Defence Minister Herve Morin said any programme based purely on police
repression was doomed to fail.
A member of Mr Sarkozy's own UMP party, Jean-Pierre
Grand, a centre-right politician, compared police round-ups of the Roma in
camps to the large-scale arrests, known in French as "rafles", of
French Jews and Gypsies during World War II.
What will happen
to the Roma who have been sent home?
Bulgarian and Romanian Roma face discrimination at
home, and Roma communities in both countries have faced forced evictions.
Generally, they have a low standard of living, high
unemployment and low literacy levels.
Some Roma threatened with deportation say that if they
are sent home, they will simply come back.
     
   
Roma around Europe
     
      Tracing the history of the Roma :

Beginning a
series on the modern-day plight of Roma Gypsies in Europe, by BBC Russian for
the World Service, Delia Radu traces the ethnic group's nomadic history back to
northern India.

"Who
are these people?" asks the man behind the counter in the photo store in
Southall, an area also known as London's Little India.
He is
handing over my order: a hefty pile of colour photographs, of which a picture
of two Roma women and their children (above) is the first.
"They
look just like the Banjara in Rajasthan - that's where I come from," he
says.
He points
to a beautiful print on the wall, showing a glamorous group of female Banjara
dancers.
The
similarity is striking.
Historians
agree that the Roma's origins lie in north-west India and that their journey
towards Europe started between the 3rd and 7th Centuries AD - a massive
migration prompted by timeless reasons: conflicts, instability and the seeking
of a better life in big cities such as Tehran, Baghdad and, later on,
Constantinople.
Some of
these Indian immigrant workers were farmers, herdsmen, traders, mercenaries or
book-keepers. Others were entertainers and musicians.
They
settled in the Middle East, calling themselves Dom, a word meaning
"man".




 Post-war European governments on both
sides of the Iron Curtain denied the Roma Holocaust survivors any recognition
or aid


To this day
they retain their name and speak a language related to Sanskrit.
Large
numbers moved into Europe, where the D, which was anyway pronounced with the
tongue curled up, became an R, giving the word Rom. Today's European Roma (the
plural of Rom) are their descendants.
'Untouchables'
Maybe
because they were carrying customs and memories connected to their Hindu gods,
the Roma were regarded as heathens in Byzantium and were assimilated into a
heretic sect: "the Untouchables" or Atsingani. This designation is
the root of the words used for "Gypsy" in most European languages,
such as the French "Tzigane" and the German "Zigeuner".
By the 14th
Century, journeying further into Europe, perhaps fleeing the Turks or perhaps
the plague, the Atsingani were to be found in Bulgaria, Serbia, and Greece.



Roma have
worked as coppersmiths possibly since the "Persian period"
They worked
on the land or as craftsmen but in two Romanian principalities, Wallachia and
Moldova, they were pushed into slavery and feature prominently in property
deeds.
About a
century later the Roma fled towards Ukraine and Russia.
Some
presented themselves as pilgrims or penitents, and like any such group
wandering throughout Europe during that era they were given aid or shelter.
This
welcoming attitude changed dramatically around the year 1500.
Historians
believe this might have happened because the numbers of the immigrants grew
bigger, but they also were seen as spies for the Turks, and consequently hunted
and killed by decree.
This led to
what some historians dub "the first Roma genocide" - a period of
fierce repression.
There were
hangings and expulsions in England; branding and the shaving of heads in
France; severing of the left ear of Roma women in Moravia, and of the right one
in Bohemia.
Following
these expulsions and killings, large groups of Roma travelled back East,
towards Poland, which was more tolerant.
Russia was
also a place where the Roma were treated less heavy-handedly, notably being
allowed to retain nomadic or semi-nomadic ways of living, as long as they paid
the annual taxes - the "obrok".
Children
removed
In
contrast, the policy of the West, especially during the Age of Enlightenment
was to "civilise" the Roma through brutal forced assimilation.
The
repression included: 24 strokes of the cane for the use of the "Gypsy
language"; forbidding Roma to marry among themselves; restricting the
numbers of Roma musicians; taking away children as young as four years old from
their parents and distributing them among the neighbouring towns, "at
least every two years".



Roma
families were among the first victims of the Holocaust
In some
cases these policies did force Roma to become assimilated. But many took to the
road again.
The
persecutions culminated in the Holocaust, or Porajmos - "the
Devouring" - as it is called in Romany.
The Roma
found themselves among the first victims of Nazi policies.
They were
sent to die in the gas vans of Chelmno, and were subjected to gruesome
experiments in the extermination camps.
Up to
500,000 Roma are believed to have been killed under fascist rule.
Poverty-stricken
Yet
post-war European governments on both sides of the Iron Curtain denied the Roma
Holocaust survivors any recognition or aid.
In the
communist bloc some managed to reach the modest living standards of the era,
most often at the price of giving up their language and identity, while the
majority of Roma continued to lead poverty stricken lives on the margins of
society.
In many
cases there were special policies towards Roma, including coerced sterilisation
(Czechoslovakia) or forcing them to change their names and hiding their
dwellings behind concrete walls (Bulgaria).
The demise
of the communist regimes in 1989 in Central and Eastern Europe was followed by
an upsurge of anti-Roma violence in almost every country.
Today, six
million out of the estimated 10 million European Roma live in Central and
Eastern Europe.
Up to two
million are to be found in Romania, whose established Roma slave markets
horrified Western travellers until as late as the 19th Century.
Decades of
communism and the recent admission of Eastern countries into the EU seem to
have made little difference to their history of exclusion and poverty.
Most Roma
families live in small shacks with no electricity or running water, and
international institutions calculate that Roma poverty rates are up to 10 times
higher than those of the majority population where they live, while their
lifespan is 10 or 15 years lower.

Source: ews.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/8136812.stm
     
      Slovakia's own separation barrier
     
      Roma Holocaust victims speak out
                  Grappling with a Roma identityFrance's deportation of Roma shown to be
illegal in leaked memo, say critics
Free movement, not free settlement, says
minister as order suggests Sarkozy policy saw ethnic minority camps singled out
                       
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              Kim Willsher
in Paris
              guardian.co.uk,
Monday 13 September 2010 20.31 BST
              Article history

France's deportation of Roma was
defended by immigration minister Eric Besson after a leaked memo suggested the
minority were being singled out. Photograph: Martin Bureau/AFP
France
vowed today to continue deporting Roma
Gypsies after critics claimed a leaked document suggesting they are being
targeted on President Nicolas Sarkozy's orders means the expulsions are against
the constitution and break international human rights laws on discrimination.
The
leaked memo emerged a few days after France's immigration minister, Eric
Besson, insisted that sending police to destroy camps and settlements and
ordering inhabitants to leave France was not aimed at the Roma. He insisted
they were being treated no differently to other EU migrants who do not meet
France's residency rules.
However,
the internal order, circulated to police chiefs last month as France began
expelling nearly 1,000 Roma Gypsies to Romania and Bulgaria, appeared to
confirm the ethnic minority was being singled out.
Today
Besson repeated his claim: "France has not taken any measure specifically
against the Roma [who] are not considered as such but as natives of the country
whose nationality they have," he said.
However,
a leaked memo, dated 5 August 2010 and signed by the chief of staff for
interior minister Brice Hortefeux, reminds French officials of a "specific
objective" set out by Sarkozy.
"Three
hundred camps or illegal settlements must be evacuated within three months;
Roma camps are a priority," the memo reads. "It is down to the préfect
[state representative] in each department to begin a systematic dismantling
of the illegal camps, particularly those of the Roma."
Besson
told France 2 state television that he was not aware of the leaked circular:
"I wasn't a recipient, and therefore I didn't need to know about it,"
he said.
He
refused to make any further comment but added: "The concept of ethnic
minorities is a concept that does not exist among the government."
Later,
in a press conference, he said: "We will maintain our policy of expelling
illegal immigrants. This is not something new." He said 5,000 Romanians
and Bulgarians had been expelled so far this year, compared with 10,000 in
2009.
He
admitted there had been an increase in deportations since August, following
"Nicolas Sarkozy's demand to go ahead with the dismantling of all illegal
camps".
In
what was seen as a criticism of the Romanian authorities, he added: "Free
movement in the European area doesn't mean free settlement. What has been forgotten
is that each of the European countries is responsible for its own national
citizens."
The
document has sparked furious reactions from the opposition and critics of the
expulsions. The Group for Information and Support for Immigrants (Gisti) says
it is examining the memo to establish if it breaks any criminal laws.
"Can
you imagine a circular specifically naming Jews or Arabs?" said Stephane
Maugendre, a lawyer and president of Gisti.
The
Socialist party has also questioned whether the document is legal and said it
smacked of "xenophobic policy".
"I
ask the European commission and its president José Manuel Barroso to initiate
infringement proceedings against the French government to end the indignity and
stigma unacceptable to the European citizens that are Roma," said Harlem
Désir, a French Socialist MEP.
France
is continuing the Roma deportations despite vehement criticism at home and from
the EU and United Nations.Last Thursday the European parliament passed a
resolution by 337 votes to 245 calling on Paris to "immediately suspend
all expulsions of Roma", saying the policy "amounted to
discrimination".
The
MEPs admitted their demands were not legally binding but pointed out that mass
expulsions are prohibited under EU law "since they amount to discrimination
on the basis of race and ethnicity".
Belgian
MEP Guy Verhofstadt, a former prime minister, said it was unacceptable for
politicians to be "tempted by populist, racist and xenophobic
policies".
German
MEP Martin Schulz, head of the European parliament's socialist group, said:
"The country that gave us liberté, égalité and fraternité has taken a
different, regrettable path today."
The
French authorities appear determined and defiant in the face of such
international condemnation. Yesterday officials in Marseille announced more
than 100 Roma would be flown back to their home countries today having accepted
€300 to return.
Several
groups representing immigrant organisations plan to ask the French Council of
State to consider the leaked memo to see whether it contravenes the French
Constitution. If the Council, the country's highest administrative court but
made up of government members, is formally approached the authorities may be
forced to temporarily suspend expulsions or Roma. The French government would
be at liberty to then send around another memo, but one that did not
specifically mention the Roma.
              




               larger
| smaller
              Roma
· France · European Union
Related
              9 Sep 2010
French 'anti-Gypsy policy' denounced by European parliament
              13 Sep 2010
Orders to police on Roma expulsions from France leaked
              3 Aug 2010
Scapegoating will not solve 'Roma problem'




French 'anti-Gypsy policy' denounced by European parliament
Liberal resolution with 337 majority
rebukes Nicolas Sarkozy for deporting Roma and destroying their camps
              Ian Traynor in Brussels
              guardian.co.uk, Thursday 9 September 2010
18.00 BST
     
              larger
| smaller

Roma children at an encampment
in Lille. France has deported many Gypsy migrants to Bulgaria and Romania this
year. Photograph: Denis Charlet/AFP/Getty Images
Nicolas Sarkozy has been accused by the European parliament of
stirring up racism through his anti-Gypsy campaign in a highly unusual vote
against a leading EU country that has humiliated the centre-right dominating
the politics of Europe.
A parliament resolution denouncing the French government's policy of deporting Roma families
and demolishing their encampments was carried by a much bigger majority than
expected – a vote of 337 to 245, bringing an uncommon victory for the
centre-left and liberals in a chamber dominated by conservatives.
The resolution carried by the parliament also strongly criticised the European commission, which polices
observance of European law, for appeasing the French and "failing to do
its job".
The motion was proposed by social democrats, liberals, Greens and the
hard left, and demanded an instant halt to the expulsions in France.
An opposing resolution from the centre-right European People's party,
grouping Christian democrats and conservatives including Sarkozy's UMP, failed
to criticise the French policy and was defeated.
Eric Besson, the French immigration minister, who was in Romania today
pressing Bucharest to do more to integrate its large Roma/Gypsy
minority, dismissed the parliament's attack. Paris would not bow to its
"political diktat", he announced. "France has taken no specific
measures against the Roma," he said.
Last month French police expelled 977 Roma, mostly to Romania, and
demolished 128 camps, according to official French figures. The Gypsies from
Romania are EU citizens and enjoy the right of freedom of movement in the
union.
The French policy's contradictions were highlighted by the case of three
Roma from Romania expelled from northern France. They received a deportation order,
crossed the border into Belgium, walked a few metres, then turned around and
legally walked back into France under the watching eyes of a French official.
"This is to demonstrate the absurdity of French government policy
on the Roma," said their lawyers, Clément Norbert and Antoine Berthe.
The European parliament resolution is non-binding, purely a verbal
rebuke. But it represents a big blow to French prestige, not least because the
parliament sits in France, in Strasbourg. It is rare for the parliament to
single out a big founding member of the EU for such a reprimand.
The result of the vote was also a fiasco for the centre-right EPP, the
strongest caucus in the parliament representing Angela Merkel's Christian
democrats from Germany, Silvio Berlusconi's deputies from Italy and Sarkozy's
own UMP MEPs.
The voting figures indicated that many conservatives are deeply uneasy
about the French policies, which have also split the Sarkozy cabinet and been
denounced by the Vatican and the United Nations.
The parliament said it was "deeply concerned at the inflammatory
and openly discriminatory rhetoric that has characterised political discourse
during the repatriations of Roma, lending credibility to racist statements and
the actions of extreme rightwing groups".
It accused the European commission of doing too little too late in
considering whether France was breaking EU freedom of movement laws and
anti-discrimination rules. "This places the commission under renewed
pressure to begin legal action against the French authorities for failing to
respect the rule of law in the way it has been targeting the Roma as an ethnic
group," said Claude Moraes, the Labour MEP who helped draft the
resolution.
In Paris on Monday, the European commission chief, José Manuel Barroso, and Sarkozy reached a truce on
the Roma row
, agreeing to play the matter down. "I've avoided
entering the debate about France because it is not my role," Barroso said.
"The subject is extremely politicised." He added, in reference to
Jean-Marie Le Pen's far-right National Front party: "It's a mistake to say
that freedom of movement must be absolute. Doing that, you'll create plenty of
Le Pens."
                        guardian.co.uk © Guardian News and Media
Limited 2011


Deported Roma promise return to France







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August 20, 2010|By the CNN Wire Staff

     
A Bulgarian Roma boy walks inside a
makeshift camp near a suburb of the Bulgarian capital Sofia on Thursday.
Some of the
Roma deported from France said Friday they plan to return as soon as possible.
They flew
Thursday to Romania on a French flight, the first of several scheduled to take
Roma out of France in the coming days.
The French
government says the deportations are part of a crackdown on illegal
immigration. They follow the government's dismantling in the past three weeks
of 51 Roma camps that it called illegal.
"Over
there, they were giving us food, money ... salary. Life is much better out
there -- happier," Mariana Serban, a mother of four, told Romania's
Realitatea TV.

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She told the
reporter she did not work in France, and smiled when the reporter pointed out
France would not give them any more money.
"That's
what they say now, but they will give us money again," Serban said.
Serban's
oldest son, Alexandru, 12, spoke in French as he told the TV station,
"It's much better in France. I'm here now for a visit, and I will leave
again. I'm staying here for two days only."
The Thursday
flight carried 79 Roma out of the country, French officials said. Friday's
flight, due to land in the Romanian city of Timisoara in the afternoon, had 132
Roma aboard, according to the office of Valentin Mocanu, Romania's secretary of
state for Roma integration.
French
officials earlier said the third flight would happen Saturday, but the Romanian
Foreign Ministry said it would take place August 26 and carry 159 Roma. The
ministry said there will also be two flights next month, carrying 27 Roma from
France to Romania.
France offered
300 euros ($384) to each Roma adult and 100 euros ($128) to each Roma child who
accepted the offer for a "voluntary return."
The comments
by the returning Roma may dash any French hopes that they will resume their
former lives in Romania.
"They
will go and meet their parents and other relatives, and after that they will
return to France, I'm telling you," Adrian Edu, an expert on Roma issues
with the Bucharest City Hall, told PRO TV.
Roma are a
group of people who live mainly in southern and eastern Europe, often in
poverty. Commonly referred to as Gypsies, they tend to live in camps, caravans,
or informal settlements and have been the target of persecution throughout
history.
Romanian
President Traian Basescu said in a statement Thursday that his country would
try to find a solution to the French situation.
"We
understand the problems Roma camps create around French cities, and we will
work with France to find suitable solutions," he said.
Roma from
Romania and Bulgaria are allowed free passage into France if they are European
Union citizens. After that, however, they must find work, start studies, or
find some other way of becoming established in France or risk deportation.
The French
government said those Roma being deported this week have overstayed the
three-month limit.
Two Romanian
secretaries of state plan to be in Paris on August 30 to discuss the
integration of Roma populations, the French Foreign Ministry said. It said
Paris favors the social integration of the Roma in Romania.
Mocanu's
office said local authorities try to integrate the returning Roma into the
workforce, offering jobs to those who come back. Roma are not obligated to
accept the job offers, however, and most of the time they don't, resulting in
their return to the country from where they came, the office said.

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      http://articles.cnn.com/2010-08-20/world/france.roma_1_roma-camps-french-cities-french-officials?_s=PM:WORLD               France begins
controversial Roma expulsion
August
19, 2010
           
              European
Commission blasts France's deportation of Roma
September 14, 2010
           
              France's Roma
expulsions face international probe
September 7, 2010
Find More Stories About »
She told the
reporter she did not work in France, and smiled when the reporter pointed out
France would not give them any more money.
"That's
what they say now, but they will give us money again," Serban said.
Serban's
oldest son, Alexandru, 12, spoke in French as he told the TV station,
"It's much better in France. I'm here now for a visit, and I will leave
again. I'm staying here for two days only."
The Thursday
flight carried 79 Roma out of the country, French officials said. Friday's
flight, due to land in the Romanian city of Timisoara in the afternoon, had 132
Roma aboard, according to the office of Valentin Mocanu, Romania's secretary of
state for Roma integration.
French
officials earlier said the third flight would happen Saturday, but the Romanian
Foreign Ministry said it would take place August 26 and carry 159 Roma. The
ministry said there will also be two flights next month, carrying 27 Roma from
France to Romania.
France offered
300 euros ($384) to each Roma adult and 100 euros ($128) to each Roma child who
accepted the offer for a "voluntary return."
The comments
by the returning Roma may dash any French hopes that they will resume their
former lives in Romania.
"They
will go and meet their parents and other relatives, and after that they will
return to France, I'm telling you," Adrian Edu, an expert on Roma issues
with the Bucharest City Hall, told PRO TV.
Roma are a
group of people who live mainly in southern and eastern Europe, often in
poverty. Commonly referred to as Gypsies, they tend to live in camps, caravans,
or informal settlements and have been the target of persecution throughout
history.
Romanian
President Traian Basescu said in a statement Thursday that his country would
try to find a solution to the French situation.
"We
understand the problems Roma camps create around French cities, and we will
work with France to find suitable solutions," he said.
Roma from
Romania and Bulgaria are allowed free passage into France if they are European
Union citizens. After that, however, they must find work, start studies, or
find some other way of becoming established in France or risk deportation.
The French
government said those Roma being deported this week have overstayed the
three-month limit.
Two Romanian
secretaries of state plan to be in Paris on August 30 to discuss the
integration of Roma populations, the French Foreign Ministry said. It said
Paris favors the social integration of the Roma in Romania.
Mocanu's
office said local authorities try to integrate the returning Roma into the
workforce, offering jobs to those who come back. Roma are not obligated to
accept the job offers, however, and most of the time they don't, resulting in
their return to the country from where they came, the office said.

-
IMMIGRATION | 16.10.2010
France meets deadline to reply to EU
over Roma deportation bill


France has
met a deadline to submit a reply to a challenge by the European Commission over
recently passed immigration legislation that has seen hundreds of ethnic Roma
deported to Romania and Bulgaria.


France has
sent its reply to the EU executive on the deportation of ethnic Roma, meeting a
midnight deadline in order to avoid legal action over the controversial
expulsions.

"We
received the French documents, we will analyze them during the weekend,"
European Commission spokesman Matthew Newman said.

Newman
would not give any details of the French reply, but French Immigration Minister
Eric Besson had earlier signaled that President Nicolas Sarkozy's government
was prepared to adapt the immigration legislation "to comply with European
law" and to have it drawn up to be presented to parliament by December.

Earlier
Friday, EU Commission spokesman Olivier Bailly told reporters that if Paris
missed the deadline, "an infringement procedure would be opened by the end
of October."


The French
representative to the Commission, Michel Barnier, said he was confident the EU
executive would make "an impartial and objective" evaluation on
whether France had done enough to escape EU sanctions.

Roma
targets

Under the
new legislation, France has repatriated more than 8,000 Roma to Romania
and Bulgaria since the beginning of the year.

It
justified this by referring to an EU directive from 2004 which stated that EU
citizens had the right to remain in a member state longer than three months
only if they could show they were working or if they had enough money to
provide for themselves and their family.

France also
pointed out that many Roma in the country were living in illegally established
camps and were without the required health insurance.

However,
the policy came under fire from Brussels when it appeared that police had been
ordered to target Roma camps as they went about tackling irregular migration.

Unfairly
expelled

EU Justice
Commissioner Viviane Reding said in September that the policy reminded her of
Nazi-era deportations of Jews and Gypsies, a statement that ignited a
fierce debate with French officials.

The United Nations
and the Roman Catholic Church also spoke out against the law, saying it
unfairly singled out Roma migrants for expulsion.

The EU
Commission's 27 members are set to debate the issue later this month and are
required to reach a unanimous decision on how to proceed.

A negative
assessment of French efforts to revise its policy would trigger an EU
infringement procedure, which could eventually see France having to defend
itself before the European Court of Justice and risk incurring a hefty fine.

Author: Darren Mara, Sarah Harman (Reuters,
AFP)
Editor: Martin Kuebler

http://www.dw-world.de/dw/article/0,,6114273,00.html
LOLA ROMAN, ZORAN, erikaek.
ok 
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